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Fishing Etiquette

Fishing Etiquette

Margaree River Fishing Etiquette. By Margaree Salmon Association

Pool Rotation:
Pool rotation can be summed up very simply: -Take your turn, and cast and move. -Should you arrive at a pool, and other anglers are there ahead of you, it will be expected that you wait your turn before entering the pool. A waiting area is usually obvious where waiting anglers gather until it is their turn.
-When it becomes your turn, you will start at the upstream end of the group of anglers, and follow the group through the pool.
-While moving through the pool, it is the usual practice to take 2 casts and then take a step downstream. Be careful not to move too far out into the pool near the fish. This may cause the fish to move away or cause them to be less likely to take a fly.
Fly Presentation:
-A dry fly may be cast up or downstream depending on your preference of presentation.
-Wet flies are cast downstream and across the current, usually on a 45 degree angle. Casting wet flies upstream increases the risk of foul hooking fish and causing unnecessary damage to the fish.
Use of sinking tip lines, sinking lines and leaders:
There is growing concern over the number of fish that are foul hooked through the use of this type of equipment. When used in combination with a heavy fly, the risk of foul hooking a fish increases. This type of equipment is normally used in high, cold water, however some anglers use them in any water conditions. It is not necessary to use this type of gear during periods of low water and we recommend not to use it during these condition.
Recommended use of Sink Tip and sinking lines and Leaders:
-Use during moderate to high water conditions.
-Be prepared with a choice of sink rate lines (some manufacturers offer six different) and adjust according to conditions.
-During a pass through the pool, should you encounter hooking bottom on one or two occasions, either speed up the retrieval of the fly line, switch to a slower sink rate line, use a smaller fly, lengthen leader or go to a floating line.
-Be aware of different water flow rates/water depth and adjust the speed of the line retrieval to match conditions, i.e.. when a sinking line/leader swings out of the faster current into the quieter water, the fly will sink to the bottom much faster. Also as the pool tails out, the water becomes more shallow.
How to release an Atlantic Salmon
-Play the fish quickly and apply enough pressure to bring it within reach for tailing. It usually takes a few attempts to finally tail the fish.
-Use a cotton or wool glove to tail the fish. This provides a better grip for large fish and especially grilse.
-KEEP THE FISH IN THE WATER. DO NOT BEACH, or semi-beach the fish. They do not have eyelids and are easily blinded if scratched by sand or gravel. DO NOT LIFT THE FISH OUT OF THE WATER BY HOLDING THE TAIL ONLY.
-Remove the hook carefully. Haemostats can be very helpful. If hooked deep or near the gills, cut the leader.
-To have a picture taken, raise the fish partially out of the water using a firm grip on the tail and at the same time support the forward part of the underbelly (pectoral fins).Have the picture taken within a few seconds.
-Hold the fish facing upstream, in the normal swimming position until it revives. Once you feel the strength return to the fish, gently release it.
-It’s a great feeling to return a wild fish back to its habitat.
Respecting the resource will help to provide a bright future with bright fish for all.